Star Wars: The Clone Wars Season 6 – The Lost Missions Review

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A long time ago, on a network far, far away, Star Wars: The Clone Wars was cancelled. But we recently learned of a new hope that the series would bring 13 final episodes to Netflix. Our high hopes were met with one of the best batches of episodes Dave Filoni and co. ever created.

Four story arcs, 13 episodes, one half of a final season. Not every loose end was dealt with. Darth Maul’s fate remains unknown while Asajj Ventress was cut off right in the middle of her triumphant reform. Still, these final episodes delivered enough that the series feels sufficiently closed, at least considering the circumstances.

The first four episodes dove head-first into Order 66, something fans have speculated would make its way to the small screen eventually. The difficult thing that this arc perfectly pulled off was telling a story revolving around Star Wars‘ darkest event without actually doing it.

When a clone kills a Jedi in combat, Fives, a fan-favorite clone since the Season 1 classic Rookies, embarks on a mission to figure out just what happened. The details surrounding Order 66, such as the Kaminoans and Count Dooku being in on it, were welcome surprises. But, at its heart, these four episodes told an engaging story that felt more like a feature-length movie than any arc before it.

Of course, it ended the only way it could. Order 66 remains undercover, but we got one hell of a good story out of it.

The next three episodes brought back Rush Clovis, an old friend of Padme’s who may have some romantic feelings for her. This of course angers Anakin, who comes closer to the Dark Side than ever in this arc. While the setup was a little slow, as the arc revolved mostly around banking, the true nature of this story was to show audiences just how terrible Anakin and Padme are for each other. They aren’t just lying to everyone around them, but to themselves as well. There are several moments where Padme seemed ready to divorce him, which provides a much clearer segue from the happy lovers at the end of Attack of the Clones to the Force choke of death at the end of Revenge of the Sith. So yes, banking doesn’t make for the most exciting Star Wars story, but developing the relationships between the characters that George Lucas failed to do in the films is more than welcome.

Sadly, the next two episodes heavily featured Jar Jar Binks. Easily the low point of the season, Jar Jar and Mace Windu travel to a Force sensitive planet where people are mysteriously disappearing. Mother Talzin turns out to be the culprit, but her send-off was hardly as exciting as every other time she appeared on this series. It’s truly tragic these two episodes were produced instead of the inevitable Darth Maul arc that would have made it into Season 6 had it aired as planned.

Luckily, the final four episodes of the season and the series more than made up for this misstep. Yoda’s travels across the galaxy, first to Dagobah, then to the origin of the Force, and finally to the Sith homeworld, were classic Star Wars world building.

But the brilliance here was how Clone Wars made connections to the entire Star Wars saga. From obvious things like Yoda visiting the cave he sends Luke to on Dagobah in Empire Strikes Back, to more subtle things like Yoda and Sidious battling over Anakin’s soul in a hallucination that may or may not have had no bearing on the physical world. The inclusion of Ahsoka in these visions was brilliant as well, lending the arc a sense of completeness with the rest of the series. 

So when you break down Season 6 of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, you have two outstanding arcs that rank among the show’s best, one arc that has excellent character development hidden behind the typical prequel politics, and two episodes of Jar Jar Binks you’ll want to forget. With Disney pushing hard for the prequel era to be forgotten, this may very well be the last time we ever see Jar Jar on screen. So let’s celebrate that, as well as a triumphant end to the best Star Wars cartoon ever and one of the best cartoons of our age. Clone Wars delivered some of the best stories within this universe ever told, these “Lost Missions” included. It’s sad that we won’t get all loose ends tied up, but these 13 episodes are certainly better than nothing. Grade: A-

By Matt Dougherty

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