Supergirl: “Hostile Takeover” Season 1 Episode 8 Review

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I want Supergirl to succeed. A bright and cheery female-led superhero series is as useful today as something like the much darker Jessica Jones, which interacts directly with feminist issues. But so much of the mythology surrounding Supergirl is just a retread of Superman’s, which is already the base for pretty much every other superhero out there. Make no mistake, the presence of Non and Astra is no different from General Zod and Faora, just like Maxwell Lord is a stand-in for Lex Luthor. Supergirl desperately wants to be able to simply replace the names on character and make things original. It’s not working.

“Hostile Takeover” had its moments. The high flying battle between Supergirl and Astra was undoubtedly awesome, proving that Supergirl‘s action could live up to what it needs to be. There was also the high drama of Kara discovering her mother’s true actions on Krypton all those years ago. But between all that, we had more from the crapshoot of a love triangle that has enveloped James and Winn’s characters. Cat continues to be developed as overly sympathetic just eight episodes in. And then there’s the climactic showdown with Non, which, just as it looks like it’s going to get somewhere interesting, cuts to black.

For everything Supergirl does right, there are two things it does wrong. I was impressed by last week’s episode to pull off both the show’s first truly spectacular scene, and one hell of a twist. That was an episode that played to the show’s strengths and downplayed its weaknesses. It gave me hope for the future. But this last episode before the break didn’t live up to that, despite a few great moments.

So until Supergirl proves itself (or it’s in the same world as The Flash and Arrow), this will have to be my last review of the show. This show just doesn’t care about its supporting characters as much as it does giving the audience what it thinks they want. Grade: C

By Matt Dougherty

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